Friday, July 30, 2004

Hail to the Chief

John Kerry accepted the nomination. Whew. What if he had that big crowd there and declined so he could earn some more money? Maybe he'd get a few more Republican votes that way, but I'm damn glad he accepted.

His speech was safe, much like his campaign. He's doing a good job of reaching out to those swing voters. Though I cheered and clapped quite often during the speech, it wasn't as radical as I might have liked, but as important as this election is, I guess it was as radical as it needed to be.

Though I'm a devout agnostic, I'm glad he brought up his faith and God. It's time the Dems take religion back. God doesn't belong to the right-wing Christian fundamentalists. God belongs to anyone and everyone who wants God in their life. Maybe if Kerry wins my faith will be restored.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

By the way, politics is for ugly people.


The dems did a lot of praising the Lord. I always get a little nervous when politicians become religious leaders. Two main reasons: 1. They really don't know much about religion and tend just to use it as empty rhetoric. There are exceptions, but generally politicians use religion to get elected but then don't really care about religious leadership or religious concerns. George Bush is a prime example. 2. If in fact a particular politician is serious about his or her religious convictions, I'm only happy with this if they happen to share my religious convictions. I get nervous when politicians embrace a religious perspective that is contrary to mine - precisely because it is in matters religious that humans tend to be most fierce. My old school liberal side still thinks politicians are best who take a live and let live approach to religion by keeping their personal religion in the background, not in the spotlight.

That's not to say religion should be kept "quiet" or "private." But by locating religion in the sphere of the "personal" I think we create a more religiously tolerant society....and politicians can facilitate this by resisting the temptation to make their personal religious opinions an election issue.

eefers said...

But remember, he said "I don't wear my religion on my sleeve."

He needed to bring it up. God doesn't belong to the Republicans. He didn't say any of his decisions were based on his religious beliefs. You would never know he's a Catholic based on that speech. I think he did a good job of bringing God back to the left, but also keeping a separation of church and state.

Anonymous said...

"God doesn't belong to the right-wing Christian fundamentalists. God belongs to anyone and everyone who wants God in their life"

"That's not to say religion should be kept "quiet" or "private." But by locating religion in the sphere of the "personal" I think we create a more religiously tolerant society....and politicians can facilitate this by resisting the temptation to make their personal religious opinions an election issue."

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